Edible Cinema — August 2018 Issue

28 Films From the Science New Wave

Nutrition, energy, pleasure. As a basic and necessary part of each day of our lives, what we eat may deserve more scrutiny than most of us give it. What is it? Where does it come from? What is it made up of? What does it do to us? As well as more esoteric questions like “Why doesn’t banana flavoring taste anything like bananas?” and “Which vitamin is essential in preventing cosmic disaster?” Films in this program, in interrogating the past, present, and future of consumption will chart all aspects of our relationship with food.

The Perfect Apple

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The Perfect Apple

For as long as humans lived around malus species, they’ve been eating apples. The apple tree has been domesticated, diversified — it has evolved in new ways via natural and artificial selection. But what is the perfect apple?

Transgenic Spidergoats

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Transgenic Spidergoats

It’s clear, if you think about it very carefully, that it would be impossible to breed a goat that had spider silk protein in it. There’s no way that mutation would occur under any natural circumstance, no matter how you bred them. Randy Lewis, a professor at University of Wyoming has done otherwise; designed goats that can be used in spinning spider silk.

Illustration Compostage

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Illustration Compostage

Composting helps the Earth to grow, it helps life to grow. This docu-animation film explores, via 3 month of photos taken once every two hours, how the passing of time turns a dying world into a new one, a current one, and a fertile one.

Popped Secret: The Mysterious Origin of Corn

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Popped Secret: The Mysterious Origin of Corn

Ten thousand years ago, corn didn’t exist anywhere in the world, and until recently scientists argued vehemently about its origins. Today the crop is consumed voraciously by us, by our livestock, and as a major part of processed foods. So where did it come from? Popped Secret: The Mysterious Origin of Corn tells the story of the genetic changes involved in the transformation of a wild grass called teosinte into corn. Evidence from genetics supports archeological findings pinpointing corn’s origins to a very particular time and place in Mexico.

Je mange la mort pour diner

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Je mange la mort pour diner

This film meant to be seen in a perpetual loop and is meditation on death, re-birth and ultimately the reincarnation of life as we enter the age of the 6th mass extinction. The phrase “ Je Mange la Mort pour Diner” is repeated throughout the film. Haseltine has created an other worldly set for this film in a fish tank which she filmed glowing droplets the artist created infusing GFP protein from a jelly fish into molecular cuisine droplets creating what Haseltine fondly call “GFP Caviar”. Her tiny molecular cuisine characters fluoresce under UV light, as they fall sideways like dense snow onto the crevices of coral skeleton. The “GFP Caviar” is Haseltine’s homage to the glowing jellies that will float like zombies enveloping and protecting the dormant genes for coral procreation for future generations for thousands of years until the next incarnation of life appears after the oceans of earth have re-calibrated after the 6th mass extinction event.

A Festival of Seed

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A Festival of Seed

‘A Festival of Seed’ is a short film capturing some of the voices from The Great Seed Festival which took place in October, 2014 to raise awareness of the importance of seed, and to celebrate seed, food and biodiversity.

How To Eat Your Own (Chocolate) Brain!

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How To Eat Your Own (Chocolate) Brain!

Putting our technical and culinary skills to the test, we challenged our 3D printing team to turn a high-tech MRI scan into a delicious, if slightly macabre, chocolate treat!

A Numbness in the Mouth

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A Numbness in the Mouth

A Numbness in the Mouth takes place in an Ireland of the near-future; a self-sustaining, militarized island where climate change has benefited agricultural production. A spokesperson for the government’s Ministry of Food- speaking in the Irish language- informs us that due to a record crop yield of wheat there is a surplus of flour on the market, and the economic balance between supply and demand must be retained. To this end, rations are being enforced with each citizen requested to consume more than five pounds of flour per day.

Amarillo (Yellow)

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Amarillo (Yellow)

The artificial flavor of banana is based on a fruit that no longer exists. Gross Michelle was, until 1960, America’s most popular strand of bananas. Its obituary is bleak, gooey, and speaks about the past, present and future global food politics.

Vitamins for Life

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Vitamins for Life

Adapted from a series of micro-fiction tweets by @quietpinetrees, this amusing pastiche of educational shorts illuminates the benefits and dangers of lesser known vitamins.

Bird Watch — Health

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Bird Watch — Health

Bird Watch is a mockumentary mini-series that documents Kuwait and the mean-region from the perspective of peripheral and/or minorities. The second episode, titled “Health”, is about a child’s point of view of a healthful lifestyle.

$2 a day

$2 a day

What can we get for two dollars? A coffee? Two stamps? A parking space downtown for 30 minutes? Alexandre Bustros bets he can eat healthily for $2 a day in Montreal. Challenging himself for 30 days, he sets out to find the best deals on groceries with his limited budget. With his purchases he creates original recipes while also countering the amount of food waste he produces.

Foodstuffs

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Foodstuffs

The landscape is hollowed and wears a desolate aspect; yet it has a rugged beauty all of its own. It is a terra incognita, though a leftover trace of some long forgotten people envelopes it. An absurd regime that is somehow still in operation; a far-reaching and all-encompassing system. An insanely complex arrangement developed to collect and store food for consumption.

A Brief History of Fat, And Why We Hate It

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A Brief History of Fat, And Why We Hate It

Fat is a complex organ, as essential as the heart or liver. Why do we hate it?

Bittersweet

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Bittersweet

Bittersweet is a half-hour documentary which follows the personal stories of young people who are living with diabetes and their daily struggle to manage it. Over the course of the documentary, we also discover ground breaking research and development in pharmacology and biomedical science, capturing the important work of CÚRAM’s Prof David Brayden and his team at UCD’s School of Veterinary Medicine, where they are developing new ways of delivering insulin to the body.

Smoothfood

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Smoothfood

A film about meals that look, smell and taste just like they should, but which are much easier to eat than regular food.

Light Plate

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Light Plate

A whimsical black and white film essay exploring the Tuscan landscape and its relationship between, tradition, modernity and food. Through shimmering hand-processed, window-framed ruminations, time passes in licks of light, while a storm gathers and a woman makes pasta by hand.

Yellow Cab 267

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Yellow Cab 267

A Japanese chef who cooks exotic illegal dishes, is chased by a health inspector who actually works for the mafia. Meanwhile dining couples talk about death and life; a producer tempts and actress with a job in exchange of some love. All these stories intertwine in a New York restaurant, a kind of parallel universe where the worlds of the living and the dead have blurry borders. “Yellow Cab 267. A Musical Hell” distorts reality like concave and convex mirrors; and depicts the dark hallucinating side of human pain, like in Goya’s Black Paintings or Hieronymus Bosch’s Triptychs.

Undune

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Undune

Undune: plants growing on terra preta.

Unbroken Ground

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Unbroken Ground

Unbroken Ground explains the critical role food will play in the next frontier of our efforts to solve the environmental crisis. It explores four areas of agriculture that aim to change our relationship to the land and oceans. Most of our food is produced using methods that reduce biodiversity, decimate soil and contribute to climate change. We believe our food can and should be a part of the solution to the environmental crisis — grown, harvested and produced in ways that restore our land, water and wildlife. The film tells the story of four groups that are pioneers in the fields of regenerative agriculture, regenerative grazing, diversified crop development and restorative fishing.

Now, Forager

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Now, Forager

Lucien and Regina gather wild mushrooms and sell them to New York restaurants. Their lifestyle is simple, their income unstable. As Regina seeks more stability and Lucien wants to devote himself to full-time nomadic foraging, their individual desires put the marriage to a test.

Living Food

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Living Food

Main objective of this project was to explore how food could evolve in the future from developments in emerging technologies. With this project I proposed a future where food shifts towards being a channel of aesthetic experiences: What if food were consumed alive, as a fictional character? What if food was able to play with our cutlery and create hyper-sensations in our mouth? Synthetic biotech has already started to create artificial life in organic forms, breathing life into artificial digestible forms no longer resides as a mere fantasy. Could this be an opportunity for us to venture into the fictional realms, through physical yet real interactions with nutritional consumables which offers a new dimension in our culinary experiences?

The Gut: Our Second Brain

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The Gut: Our Second Brain

Who decides on my mood, who determines my behavior? My consciousness or the billions of bacteria which are secretly living in my intestine? What do we know exactly about our belly, that organ full of neurons, which scientists are just beginning to explore and goes its own way?

Need for Meat

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Need for Meat

An exploration of the dilemma between the love for meat and the rational arguments against the products of the meat industry.

The Luckiest Nut in the World

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The Luckiest Nut in the World

An American peanut compares his experiences to other nuts.

Eat Me!

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Eat Me!

Glittering socialite Laura starts slipping from the daily reality of a weight obsessed rich man’s mistress. While on a fancy dinner with her gluttonous lover she enters a strange world where food dances and sings. The whirlwind of dance blows the air out of Laura’s head and she becomes a different type of girl… How people treat each other is mirrored in the way we treat our environment and our food. That’s why ‘Eat me’ focuses on our attitude to food, its dubious contents and food waste through the prism of a skewed relationship.

Animated Science: Nutrition

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Animated Science: Nutrition

The project is organized by the Scientific Culture and Innovation Unit (UCC+i) of the University of Barcelona, with the support of the Spanish Foundation for Science and Technology (FECYT) — Ministry of Economy and Competitiveness. Project URL: http://www.ub.edu/laubdivulga/cienciaanimada/episodi-3.html

Eating Lunch

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Eating Lunch

15-year-old Klara is about to eat lunch with four other youngsters at the Eating Disorder Clinic under the supervision of the nurses. They have 30 minutes to eat up.

Labocine is an Imagine Science Films initiative to extend our film programming to a broader and more diverse audience. We have over 2,000 film titles from 200 countries for all ages brought to you by artists, scientists, filmmakers and educators.

By experimenting with cinematic form and style, we are committed to provoking scientific intrigue and understanding, always ensuring compelling and well-founded narratives. Periodically, we release Spotlights online. On the first Tuesday of every month, enjoy our issue selections which complement newsworthy science by proposing a surgically curated online festival. From documentary to fiction to lab footage, we hope to always challenge the way you understand, interpret and appreciate scientific ideas and perspectives.

Submissions: If you would like to submit a film or propose a program for Spotlights, write to us at film@labocine.com

Stay tuned and email us for more information at info@labocine.com.

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